65 Ark. L. Rev. 837 (2012)
Moneyball Lawyering

handle is hein.journals/arklr65 and id is 863 raw text is: Moneyball Lawyering

Charles J. Snyder*
1. INTRODUCTION
We're blending what we see but we aren't allowing
ourselves to be victimized by what we see. - Billy Beane'
The above quotation comes from Moneyball, Michael
Lewis's now famous book about how Billy Beane made the
Oakland Athletics (the A's) competitive despite having
one of baseball's lowest payrolls.2 Combined with the
book's success, a popular movie of the same name has
made Moneyball's basic outlines relatively well-known.3
As Lewis writes, Moneyball seeks to answer an
innocent question: how did one of the poorest teams in
baseball, the Oakland Athletics, win so many games?4
Throughout the book, readers come to see that Beane and
the A's did it largely by ignoring or rejecting baseball's
conventional wisdom, relying instead on statistical
measures of performance and           value.    Reviewers have
referred to Moneyball as one of the most enjoyable
*Litigation Associate, Reed Smith LLP. The author would like to thank
Professor Russell Korobkin for his feedback and members of the editorial board of,
the Arkansas Law Review for their thoughtful work improving the article. The
author would also like to thank Rachelle Minix, Stephen Minix, Lynne Lasry, Allen
Snyder, Kevin Sanders, and Parker Tresemer for their various contributions. All
errors are my own.
1. MICHAEL LEWIS, MONEYBALL: THE ART OF WINNING AN UNFAIR GAME
37 (2003).
2. See generally id.
3. MONEYBALL (Columbia Pictures 2011).
4. LEWIs, supra note 1, at xi.
5. See generally LEWIS, supra note 1. Although Beane gets much of the credit
for this approach, it should be noted that the movement's intellectual forefather is
Bill James. See id. at 64-96. James wrote most of his pioneering work about the use
and misuse of statistics in baseball while employed as a night watchman at a pork
and beans factory. See id. at 64-65.

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