52 Antitrust Bull. 53 (2007)
Aftermarket Monopolization: The Emerging Consensus in Economics

handle is hein.journals/antibull52 and id is 59 raw text is: THE ANTITRUST BULLETIN: Vol. 52, No. 1/Spring 2007 : 53

Aftermarket monopolization:
the emerging consensus in economics
By LORENZO CoPPI*
The accepted economic definition of aftermarket is provided by
Shapiro and Teece and entails two characteristics: (1) the aftermarket
product or service is used together with a primary product, and (2)
the aftermarket product or service is purchased after the primary
product.1
There is a significant body of literature discussing the economics
of aftermarket competition. Especially after Kodak2 the economic liter-
ature has debated at length whether anticompetitive effects are likely
to arise from the supplier of a primary good monopolizing the after-
market for its product. The concern is that, having obtained or
defended a monopoly in the aftermarket for its product, a supplier of
a primary good would be able to charge a supracompetitive aftermar-
* Vice President, CRA International, Washington, DC.
Carl Shapiro & David J. Teece, Systems Competition and Aftermarkets: an
Economic Analysis of Kodak, 39 ANTITRUST BULL. 135 (1994).
2  Eastman Kodak Co. v. Image Technical Servs., Inc., 504 U.S. 451 (1992).
For economic commentaries of the case, see Carl Shapiro, Aftermarkets and
Customer Welfare: Making Sense of Kodak, 63 ANTITRUST L.J. 483 (1995); Steven
C. Salop, The First Principles Approach to Antitrust at the Millennium, 68
ANTITRUST L.J. 187 (2000); and Dennis W. Carlton, A General Analysis of Exclu-
sionan Conduct and Refusal to Deal-Why Aspen and Kodak are Misguided, 68
ANTITRUST L.J. 659 (2001).
 2007 by Federal Legal Publications, Inc.

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