29 Antitrust Bull. 1 (1984)

handle is hein.journals/antibull29 and id is 1 raw text is: The Antitrust Bulletin/Spring 1984

Introduction to the morning session
BY LAWRENCE J. WHITE*
I want to welcome you all to our seminar today on the occasion
of the tenth anniversary of the establishment of the Economic
Policy Office (EPO) in the Antitrust Division of the Department
of Justice.
I think it is fitting to begin today's event by describing a
memorandum that we were able to fish out of EPO's files. The
memorandum is dated July 24, 1973. It is signed by Thomas E.
Kauper, Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division. At the
top it says, Memorandum to all personnel in the Antitrust
Division, regarding organization of economic activities. The
first and crucial sentence reads, Effective immediately, the
Economic Section is renamed the Economic Policy Office. Thus
was born the Economic Policy Office in the Antitrust Division
and, as most of you know, George Hay was appointed the first
Director of EPO.
As is obvious even from the sentence itself, the birth of EPO
was not the first time that economics had been introduced to the
Antitrust Division. I asked Lionel Epstein, an economist in our
office, to do some research on the history of economics and
economists in the Division. In the process, I learned some history
about the Division. It turns out that the Division was not
established until 1933. Prior to that time, from 1903 until 1933,
the antitrust laws were administered by the Office of the Assis-
tant to the Attorney General. Before 1903, the laws were simply
. Professor of Economics, New York University.

 1984 by Federal Legal Publications, Inc.

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