15 Our Dumb Animals 97 (1882-1883)

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                                        I  would   not  enter  on  my   list of  friends,
                                          Though   graced   -with polished   manners and fine sense,
                                          Yet  wanting   sensibility, the  man
                                          TVho  needlessly   sets  foot upon   a  worm.  -  Cowper.


Vol.   15.                                          BOSTON, JUNE, 1882.                                                              No. 1.


   Thou shalt not see thy brother's ass or ox fall
down  by the way and  hide thyself from them:
thou shalt surely help him to lift them up again.
-DEUT.,  22d chapter.

         There's Room Enough For All.
       Ab, Rover, by those lustrous eyes
       That follow me with longing gaze,
       Which sometimes seem so human-wise,
       I  look for human speech and ways.
       By your quick instinct, matchless love,
       Your  eager welcome, mute caress,
       That all my heart's emotions move,
       And  loneliest moods and hours bless,
       I do believe, my dog, that you
       Have some beyond, some future new.
       Why not ? In heaven's inheritance
       Space must be cheap where worldly light
       In boundless, limitless expanse
       Rolls grandly far from human sight.
       He who has given such patient care,
       Such constancy, such tender trust,
       Such ardent zeal, such instincts rare,
       And  made you something more than dust,
       May yet release the speechless thrall
       At death-there's room enough for all.
       Yes, room enough-the fading flowers
       On altars paint their petals rare,
       And in God's far, celestial bowers,
       Rebloom with richer beauty there:
       The tree cut down in foliage fine,
       May still survive the cruel shock,
       And ancient wisdom could devine
       A spirit in the solid rock.
       Why should such things our sense appall ?
       God liveth in as over all.
       And so my dog, when you and I,
       Our trials past, our labors done,
       Lie down both man and brute, to-die,
       We each may find some triumph won;
       I that my faith in man and God
       Has woven me robes of fadeless hue
     And softest texture-some green sod
       Sprinkled with immortelles, for you,
       Obedient still to duty's call,
       Where there is room enough for all.
                                Our Continent.


                   Reformers.
   The criticism and attack on institutions which
 we have witnessed have made one thing plain, that
 society gains nothing whilst a man, not himself ren-
 ovated, attempts to renovate things around him
 he has become tediously good in some particular,
 but negligent or narrow in the rest, and hypocrisy
 and vanity are often the disgusting result.-
 R. W. Emerson, Essays.

                   Education.
   It was complained that an education to things
 was not  given. We  are students of words; we
 are shut up in schools and colleges and recitation
 rooms  for ten or fifteen years, and come out at
 last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and
 do not know a thing. We cannot  use our hands,
 or our legs, or our eyes or our arms. We do not
 know an edible root in the woods; we cannot tell
 our course by the stars, nor the hour of the day
 by the sun. It is well if we can swim and skate.
 We are afraid of a horse, of a cow, of a dog, of a
 snake, of a spider. The old Roman rule was, to
 teach a boy nothing that he could not learn stand-
 ing. The old English rule was: ' All summer in
 the field and all winter in the study.-R. W.
 Emerson, Essay New England  Reformers.

 THE   BUDDHIST  duty of universal love included
 not only the human race, but all beings that have
 life.   As a mother, even at the risk of her own
 Iiie, protects her son, her only son, so let a man
 cultivate good will without measure toward all
 beings. Let him  cultivate good will  without
 measure, unhindered love and friendliness toward
 the whole world, above, below, around. Stand-
 ng, walking, sitting or lying, let him be firm in
 this mind so long as he is awake: this state of
 heart, they say, is the best in the world. From
 the Metta Sutta.

 JUST   in proportion as a man  becomes  good,
 divine, Christlike, he passes out of the region of
 theorizing, of system-building, and hireling serv-
 ice into the region of beneficent activities. It is
 well to think well: it is divine to act well.-Horace
Mann.


      A Rag-Picker and her Donkey in Paris.
   I was  hurrying  by  like everybody else. A
 female rag-picker, pale and famished, led by the
 bridle a poor little donkey, which seemed a hun-
 dred years old, and which dragged a poor little
 cart, full of the rubbish of the street: rags, broken
 bottles, torn papers, worn out skillets, crusts of
 bread, and thousand nothings which are the for-
 tune of rag-pickers. The woman had  done good
 work since midnight, but the ass was ready  to
 drop. He  stopped short, as if he had made up
 his mind to go no further. His legs trembled and
 threatened to fall. He hung his head with resig-
 nation, as if awaiting the stroke of death.
 The   sight touched and  arrested .me. A man
 would have cursed and beaten the poor beast to
 rouse him; the woman looked at him with an eye
 of motherly pity. The donkey returned her look,
 as if saying, You see it is all over. I have done
 my best for you night after night, because I saw
 your misery was greater than mine.  You  have
 treated me well, sharing your bread with me, and
 your neighbor's oats, when you could steal any;
 but I am dying at last.
 The   woman   looked at him  and  said gently,
 Come,  come, dear  Pierrot, do not leave me
 here. She lightened the load by taking out a
 basket of broken  bottles. Come,  now,  she
 said, as if talking to a child, you can get along
 nicely now. She put her shoulder to the wheel,
 but the donkey did not move.  He knew  he had
 not the strength to walk to St. Ouen, his wretched
 home.  She still coaxed him.  How do you think
 we can get on this way, Pierrot? To be sure, 1
 could drag the cart. But I can't put you in it,
 and you would be  ashamed  to be dragged after
 it. The donkey raised his ears, but no move.
 I  was going to speak to her, when she ran to
 the nearest wine-shop. The ass followed her with
 anxious eyes; he seemed fearful that he would
 die without his mistress. He was so little that you
would have taken him at a distance for a Pyrenean
dog.  He had grown  gray in the harness. A few
tufts of gray hair remained here and there on his
emaciated  body.  He  looked  like a mountain
burned  bare in many  places. His resigned air
showed  a mind  free from worldly vanities. He
was far past the age where one strikes attitudes.
He was almost transparent in his leanness. But
his face was  all the more  expressive. It had
something almost human   in its intelligence and
goodness.  Why  had he  been condemned to such


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