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34 Alaska L. Rev. i (2017)

handle is hein.journals/allr34 and id is 1 raw text is: 











           NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

     The Alaska Law Review is pleased to present our June 2017 issue, the
first in our thirty-fourth volume. We are gratified to be able to share with
you this new issue, which features three Articles and two student Notes.
These  pieces touch on  a variety of legal issues that are currently
significant for Alaska, from pretrial diversions to the Permanent Fund
Dividend to public school funding.
     Our  first Article, titled The Anchorage, Alaska Municipal Pretrial
Diversion Program: An Initial Assessment, is written by Cory R. Lepage and
Jeff D. May. Dr. Lepage is an assistant professor in the Justice Center at
the University of Alaska Anchorage; Mr. May serves on the faculty of the
University of Alaska Fairbanks Justice Program. Analyzing in depth the
success of the Anchorage Pretrial Diversion Program, Dr. Lepage and Mr.
May   determine that the program  is both efficient and cost saving,
suggesting that it should be considered for use on a more widespread
level as a resource saving alternative to current methods.
     Our second  Article, titled Truth and Reconciliation Commissions: A
Needed Force in Alaska?, is written by Heather Parker, a graduate of the
Williamette University College of Law  and  a clerk for Judge Philip
Pallenberg, who serves on the Juneau Superior Court. Describing the use
of truth and reconciliation commissions throughout the United States and
other countries, Ms.  Parker considers the  implementation  of such
commissions in Alaska, ultimately arguing that they could be valuable for
improving both transparency and dialogue.
     Our  third Article is written by Ashley K. Sundquist, a  recent
graduate of the University of Missouri School of Law and an upcoming
clerk for Judge Sharon Gleason, who serves on the United States District
Court for the District of Alaska. In her Article, titled The Economic Loss
Doctrine in Alaska and the Design Professional Exception, Ms. Sundquist
starts with an  overview  of the economic  loss doctrine in Alaska,
identifying the two main  exceptions currently provided by  Alaskan
courts: the design professional exception and the independent  duty
exception. Ms.  Sunduqist  concludes  that  the design  professional
exception causes inconsistent results, and that the independent duty
exception should instead be applied equally across all professions.
     Along with these three articles, the Alaska Law Review is happy to
include two  student Notes, both written by current members  of our
journal. Our first student Note, written by Eli Kozminsky, is entitled
Children and Alaska's Permanent Fund Dividend: Reasons for Rethinking

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