31 Am. Lab. Legis. Rev. 153 (1941)
I.L.O. Wartime Conference, The

handle is hein.journals/alablegr31 and id is 155 raw text is: The I.L.O. Wartime Conference
O WING to war conditions the major part of the key personnel
of the official International Labor Office was moved in Novem-
ber, 1940, from its extensive headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland,
to McGill University in Montreal. Here the I.L.O. continues essen-
tial work of research and publication.
The usual annual International Conference of the I.L.O. was not
held in 1940, but preparations were carried over into 1941 when a
conference of different character was convened on October 27 for a
period of 10 days at Columbia University in New York City. The
usual concentration on a number of draft labor treaties, to point up
the results of a year of research and three weeks of discussion, was
this time wholly lacking. It was not a propitious time to launch draft
treaties for uniform international ratification.
Much discussion in 1941 was, as in previous years, devoted to
delegate criticism of the 112 printed pages of Director's report-this
time entitled The I.L.O. and Reconstruction. The Conference also
had before it a 152 page document on Wartime Developments in
Government-Employer-Worker Collaboration, and it introduced a
series of resolutions designed to steer the course of its International
Labor Office during another wartime year.
In the resolutions adopted there is considerable repetition of state-
ment. Out of the welter of language, however, the determination to
go forward steadfastly under very great difficulties is made abundantly
clear. Gratitude was expressed that the life, the underlying spirit,
and the freedom of action of the Organization itself have been pre-
served.
Outstanding in new policy, the Office is directed to proceed at
once with research and planning in order that the I.L.O. may be
prepared to function immediately and effectively in post-war read-
justments. One specific resolution, recognizing that the international
character of shipping will become even more pronounced after the
war, authorizes the Director to consult all interested organizations,
institutions and individuals in order that when the war ends plans
will be available for the immediate regulation of economic and social
conditions in the mercantile marine. Another resolution charges the
Director with preparation of a definite scheme for a World Textile
Office. The Governing Body is requested to consider the appointment

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