11 Am. J. Police 85 (1992)
The Modern Campus Police: An Analysis of Their Evolution, Structure, and Function

handle is hein.journals/ajpol11 and id is 171 raw text is: American Journal of Police Vol. 11, No. 2 1992 85

THE MODERN CAMPUS POLICE:
AN ANALYSIS OF THEIR EVOLUTION,
STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION
John J. Sloan
University of Alabama-Birmingham
Although campus police have existed in various forms since the
turn of the century, police researchers have neglected any in-depth
study of this form of policing. Instead, the writings and practical ob-
servations of campus law enforcers have dominated the campus police
literature.
Bordner and Petersen (1983) explain this apparent lack of interest
in the campus police as the product of three major factors: (1) The
campus protest literature of the 1960s and 1970s virtually ignored the
role of campus police in quelling student unrest (e.g., Dynes, 1972;
Flicker, 1969; Holmes, 1969; Stark, 1974); (2) The fact that, histori-
cally, campus police have been little more than custodians (Kassinger,
1971); and (3) The fact that modem campus police did not originate
until the late 1960s and early 1970s (Gelber, 1972).
This paper presents the results of a pilot study of campus police at
ten large universities located in the Midwest and the Southeast. The
paper begins with a historical analysis of the evolution of the campus
police, reviews the scholarly literature on the campus police, and pre-
sents the highlights of a descriptive analysis of a sample of campus po-
lice departments and officers. Finally, the striking similarities between
campus police and their municipal counterparts will be discussed.

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