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3 Afr. Hum. Rts. L.J. 275 (2003)
Police Accountability in Kenya

handle is hein.journals/afrhurlj3 and id is 287 raw text is: AFRICAN HUMAN RIGHTS LAW JOURNAL
Police accountability in Kenya
Joshua N Auerbach*
Project Officer, Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI), New Delhi,
India
Recently the police shot eight gangsters, which means that eight of them
have been sent out of the streets for life. We believe that law enforcement
officers should continue doing the same in a bid to reduce crime.
- Hon Marsden Madoka, Minister for Internal Security
(Office of the President), Kenya, 3 April 2000
I have word from the President that there shall not be orders from anywhere
else except your immediate superiors.
- Hon Chris Murungaru, Minister for Provincial Administration
and National Security, Kenya, 20 February 2003
Summary
This article examines the Kenya Police Force and how the current
'constitutional moment' may be seized for much needed reform. The police
have been at the nexus of the most serious problems facing Kenyan society:
corruption, crime, inter-ethnic violence and vigilantism. Institutional
arrangements are needed to ensure police accountability. Accountability has
the following components: popular accountability, legal accountability and
transparency. It is essential that the police be insulated from extralegal or
illegal political interference and that internal and external supervisory and
complaints mechanisms holding members of the police accountable, exist.
The article discusses police accountability in Kenya. Brief comparative
sketches of Uganda, Nigeria, South Africa and Northern Ireland are given.
These countries have taken steps to broaden the range of actors and
institutions to which the police are accountable and to have the executive
JD (Harvard); jauerbach@lycos.com. An earlierversion of this paper was distributed as a
background note at 'Police as a Service Organisation: An Agenda for Change,' a
conference on police reform jointly sponsored by CHRI and the Kenya Human Rights
Commission. My thanks go to Maja Daruwala, GP Joshi and Michelle Kagari, all of CHRI,
for their editorial advice and encouragement.

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