About | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline

Index 1-6 C.R. Dig. 37 (1975)

handle is hein.civil/newprspc0007 and id is 1 raw text is: 









An Author/Title Index of the


Civil Rights Digest

VOLUMES 1-6

Compiled by David Tsuneishi


                     A

A-95: A Deterrent to Discriminatory Zoning,
  I. Sikorsky, Jr., 5:2 (Aug. 1972), 16-19.
Abarca, Tony, Equal Administration of Justice:
  Reflections of a Spanish Speaking Interpreter,
  3:2 (Spring 1970), 8-11.
Affirmative Action in Labor Contracts: Some Im-
  plications for College and University Person-
  nel, North Barry Dancy, 5:3 (Oct. 1972), 41-45.
After Twenty Years: Reflections upon the Con-
  stitutional Significance of Brown v. Board of
  Education, Archibald Cox, 6:4 (Summer 1974),
  38-45.
Alinsky, Saul D., The Double Revolution, 4:2
  (Spring 1971), 30-34:
All They Do Is Run Away! Katy and Armin Beck,
  5:2 (Aug. 1972), 35-39.
Americans for Indian Opportunity, LaDonna
   Harris, 4:2 (Spring 1971), 14-17.
 Andrew, Ralph. See Berke, Joel S.
 Anti-racism: The New Movement, Erbin Crowell,
   Jr., 2:1 (Winter 1969), 24-30.
An Approach to Minority Funding, Clarence M.
   Dunnaville, 4:1 (Winter 1971), 16-20.
 Aquilar, Linda, Unequal Opportunity and the Chi-
   cana, 5:4 (Spring 1973), 31-33.
 Arons, Stephen, The Joker in Private School Aid,
   4:1 (Winter 1971), 28-33.
 Assimilate-or Starvel Joseph Muskrat, 5:3 (Oct.
   1972), 27-34.

                      B
 Barriers to Black Political Participation, Vernon
   E. Jordan, Jr., 5:3 (Oct. 1972), 2-5.
 Beck, Armin. See Beck, Katy.



,David Tsuneishi is a bibliographer in the National
Clearinghouse Library at the Commission on Civil
Rights.
WINTER 1975


Beck, Katy and Beck, Armin, All They Do Is Run
  Away! 5:2 (Aug. 1972), 35-39.
Beebe, Leo C., letter, 3:2 (Spring 1970), 48.
Bell, Derrick A., Jr., Integration-Is It a No-Win
  Policy for Blacks? 5:4 (Spring 1973), 15-23.
Bellamy, Alabama: Company Town Revisited,
  James D. Williams, 2:4 (Fall 1969), 12-19.
Berke, Joel S., Goettel, Robert J., and Andrew, Ralph,
  Equity in Financing New York City's Schools:
  The Impact of Local, State and Federal Policy,
  5:3 (Oct. 1972), 20-26.
Bias in Non-commercial Films, 2:1 (Winter 1969),
  14-15.
Black Americans in Sports: Unequal Opportu-
  nity for Equal Ability, Norman R. Yetman and
  D. Stanley Eitzen, 5:2 (Aug. 1972), 20-34.
Black Belt, Alabama, James Peppler, 1:2 (Summer
  1968), 21-28. Photo essay.
Black Is to City/As White Is to Suburbs, Chester
  Hartman, 3:2 (Spring 1970), 34-41.
Black Studies: The Case For and Against, Wallis
  W. Johnson, 3:4 (Fall 1970), 30-35.
Black Vote in Danger, Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., 2:2
  (Spring 1969), 1-7.
Black Women Who Work, 1:2 (Summer 1968),
   16-17.
 Blacks and Whites: Measuring the Changes, 5:2
 (Aug. 1972), 8-11.
 Blakey, William A., Everybody Makes the Revo-
   lution: Some Thoughts on Racism and Sexism,
   6:3 (Spring 1974), 10-19.
 Bleier, Edward, Some Recollections and Specu-
   lations of a White Broadcaster, 3:1 (Winter
   1970), 16-18.
 Bradley, George C., and Seymour, Richard S., When
   Voting Rights Are Denied, 2:3 (Summer 1969),
   1-5.
 Breakthrough for Bilingual Education: Lau v.
   Nichols and the San Francisco School System,
   Dexter Waugh and Bruce Koon, 6:4 (Summer
   1974), 18-26.

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 3,000 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Contact us for annual subscription options:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?

profiles profiles most