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11 Transcript 1 (1966-1967)

handle is hein.barjournals/tscb0011 and id is 1 raw text is: x219J6ft

A News Publication of the S. C. Bar Association

VOLUME 11, No. 1

AUGUST, 1966

1515 GREEN ST.

COLUMBIA, S. C.

RICHLAND BAR TO HOST SEMINAR
ON SERVICES FOR THE POOR
The Richland County Bar Association
and South Carolina Bar Association are plan-
ning a seminar on Legal Services for the
poor on Saturday, August 27, 1966.
The program   will include sessions ol
civil and criminal law with special em-
phasis oil the approach of South Carolina
in n.eting the needs of tile indigent in
both fields.
Among the speakers who are tentatively
scheduled invitations are Charles E. Edson,
Assistant Director of the Legal Services
Division of the OEO, who will speak on
the OEO Legal Services Program and Wil-
liam R. Klaus, a member of the firm of
Peper, Hamiltion and Scheetz, of Phila-
delphia, and  chairman of a committee
which has recently established t full time
program of legal services ir PHiladelphia.
Mr. Klause will speak on the role of the
Bar Associations in providing services to
the indigent.
A noted authority in the area of criminal
law will discuss the impact of Gideon,
Escobedo, and ,Miranda on the administra-
tion of criminal law. Leo H. Hill of Green-
ville and Lowell W. Ross of Columbia will
discuss the solution proposed for South
Carolina.
The program is slated to last all day
and will end with a cocktail party in plenty
(Cunrined on Page 3)
RIGHTS OF THE ACCUSED
Following a long series of far reaching
decisions,t the U. S. Supreme Court in
Miranda v. Arizona has considered The
restraints society must observe consistent
with the Federal Constitution in prosecut-
ing individuals for crime . . ..! The court,
in a 5- opinion, intending to explain and
amplify earlier decisions, especially Esco-
bedo, held:
1. An accused must be told by police
that he has the right to remain
silent.
2. An accused must be told that he is
entitled to counsel.
3. If the accused at any time indicates
that he wishes to consult with an
attorney a lawyer must be provided.
-I. It desired by an accused, air attrr-
lhey  munst hv Ilre(eit during all
interrogation.
!Continued on Page 2)

WALLACE S. MURPHY NAMED
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF BAR
Lieutenant Colonel \Vallace S. Murphy
United States Army Judge Advocate's Gen-
eral Corps, has been named Executive Sec-
retary for the South Carolina Bar Asso-
ciation. Colonel Murphy, who is !ctiring
from tile Army after 20 years of military
service, will assume the duties of his new
position as of September 1, 1966.

4:d

A'

MURPHY
Educated at the College of Charleston
and University of South Carolina, Col. MIuor-
phy wvas graduated from the University of
South Carolina School of Law in 1949, sec-
ond in his class, and a member of Wig and
Robe. Subsequent to his graduation front
law school lie went on to do graduate work
at Georgetown University in Interrational
Relations and International Liw, attedcd
the Jrud(ge Advocate Ceneral's Advarced
(.'oss arird graduated from Unitcd States
Ariny (-rerurand and (enirl Strt C0Ilhei..
Illhing participated in World War II as
a Irerriber of the United States Arminy Air
(Ccntinued cn Page 3)

RICHLAND BAR TO APPLY
The increasing awareness of the necessity
for a realistic approach to the problem of
legal services for the poor marks one of the
most significant challenges to face the legal
profession in decades.
Recent legislation, Economic Opportunity
Act of 1964, has focused attention on the
need for representation of the poor in civil
matters. This same legislation has been in-
tenitionally silent on the question of repre-
sentation of the indigent criminal, taking
the position that representation of such
individuals is the constitutional responsibil-
ity of the State. Through the Legal Service
Division of the OEO, funds are available
for th& establishment of legal aid programs
on the local level.
There are now in existence some 160
Legal Services Programs in 43 States, op-
erating with grants from OEO, having a to-
tal budget of approximately 26 million dol-
lars.
Legal Aid is not new     to the legal
profession. There have been Legal Aid So-
cieties in many states for many years which
operated  under funds donated   through
united fund organizations, by individual
lawyers and bar associations and founda-
(Continued on Page 3)
WILLIAM    B. REGAN TO HEAD
PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE
\Villiam B. Regan, of Columbia has been
rnaned to head a new Public Relations Com-
mittee of tire South Carolina Bar Associa-
tion. Tire Committee, which will operate
rrder the direction of the Executive Com-
mittee, has the responsibility of dissemi-
nating information to the news media on
Bar activities. Tile Committee is broken
down into policy and corresponding mem-
hers. Tire latter are located throughout
the state and will see that news releases
reach the various news media in their area.
.Auy information concerning Bar Asso-
CiiatiOn activities or ir'rilbers which irav be
I itiaviest to tire public slioldl be forward-
cd to William  B. Regan at 1213 Lady
Street in Columbia.

FEDERAL FUNDS AVAILABLE
FOR LOCAL LEGAL AID PROGRAMS
By LOWELL ROSS, Chairman, South Carolina Bar Association Committee
on Legal Services to The Poor

m

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