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14 Or. St. B. Bull. 1 (1953-1954)

handle is hein.barjournals/osbb0014 and id is 1 raw text is: OREGON STATE BAR
BULLETIN
VOL. XIV    OCTOBER, 1953  No. 1

JACK SELECTED AS  MILITARY JUSTICE

REGIONAL MEETING

PRESIDENT OF BAR PROBLEMS OUTLINED  APPROVED BY BAR

Glenn R. Jack, Oregon City, member of
the board of governors from the first con-
gressional district, was elected president of
the Oregon State Bar by the board at its
meeting in Gearhart on September 16. Jack
took office at the concluding session of the
annual convention on the 19th, when Rob-
ert A. Leedy, Portland, retiring president
turned the gavel over to him when Leedy
made his report of stewardship for the
past year.
Jack, a past president of the Clackamas
County Bar association and past state com-
mander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is
serving his third year on the board of
governors. A veteran of naval service in
World War I, he has been in practice in
Oregon since 1923. He also is a member
of the California bar.
The vice-presidency went to Carl A. Dahl,
Portland, also a third year member of the
board. Dahl has been in practice in Port-
land since 1927. He is a former deputy city
attorney and has served as president of the
Multnomah Bar association.
The board named Allen G. Fletcher, Port-
land, as treasurer. He has long been a mem-
ber of the bar committee on continuing
legal education and active in various state
and local bar programs.
Lee W. Karr, Portland, was reelected
secretary of the state bar and has entered
upon his fifth year in that office.
The new officers were introduced during
the convention along with George A. Rho-
ten, Salem; Martin P. Gallagher, Ontario;
Paul R. Harris, Portland, and Edward A.
Butler, Eugene, newly elected board mem-
bers who took office during the convention.
Other holdover members of the board are
Wendell Wyatt, Astoria; Paul P. Farrens,
Klamath Falls; Orval D. Yokum, John Day;
Thomas H. Tongue III, Portland; William
E. Walsh, Coos Bay, and Samuel M. Bowe,
Grants Pass.
The new members of the board met with
the old board for the business meeting prior
to the opening of the convention and also
attended the annual family night dinner
on Wednesday when new and old members
of the board going back to the first group
in 1935 hold their annual reunion.
At its business meeting, the board dis-
posed of a number of discipline matters
after which the matter of the American
Bar regional meeting was discussed and
President Elect Jack was selected to pre-
sent the matter to the convention. The con-
vention by unanimous vote accepted the
invitation and the convention will be held
in Portland next May. Jack also was named
to present the suggested division of the
ninth circuit court. The bar, however, did
(Continued on Page 7, Column 1)

The problem of balance between the
necessity for discipline and command au-
thority in the nation's military establish-
ments and assuring to the individual the
greatest degree possible of protection un-
der law and due process is one of the ever
present conflicts personnel of the armed
services judge advocate branch are con-
stantly facing, Rear Admiral Ira H1. Nunn,
judge advocate general of the army, told
members of the Multnomah Bar associa-
tion at a dinner meeting in Portland Octo-
ber 13.
The general public, Admiral Nunn said,
has a complete lack of understanding for
the maintenance of discipline in the armed
forces, and all too frequently use the yard-
stick of civil criminal procedure in evalu-
ating courts martial proceedings.
The sole purpose of the navy, like the
other armed forces, is the protection of
this nation, and good discipline is essential
in carryin', out this assignment.
The vast majority, almost 80 percent, of
the offenses in the navy are concerned
with unauthorized absence. In civilian life
this is no crime, but to the armed services
this is of paramount importance. The
whole key to an adequate defense is that
every man in military service be where he
is supposed to be at a given time.
Further, in civil life, he continued, the
public is usually in support of law enforce-
ment. Military life is detached from the
civilian community and civilians, generally,
are not atuned to the necessity for certain
rules and regulations because there is no
immediate or possible direct effect upon
them if these rules and regulations are vio-
lated.
The admiral regretted the loss in man
power by the necessity of confining ac-
cused military personnel until after trial
and confirmation of the conviction, This is
(Continued on Page 8, Column 2)
The Lawyers' Placement committee of
the Oregon State Bar is desirous of con-
tinuing its program with the end in view
of offering the maximum amount of
assistance to newly admitted attorneys
who as yet have not found suitable loca-
tions. Apparently a large percentage of
the 1953 admittees have now obtained
satisfactory connections. The committee
however is anxious to hear from those
who still desire assistance and its work
will be facilitated if all who are not yet
located will so advise the undersigned.
Hugh L. Barzee, Chairman,
Lawyers' Placement Committee.

BY FRED G. TAYLOR
(Note: Page references in the following
article refer to the published committee
reports.)
Oregon State Bar, at its Gearhart con-
,ention, approved the recommendation of
the board of governors that the American
Bar association be Invited to hold a region-
al session in Portland May 24-26, but it
tabled a proposal, which had been sub-
mitted without recommendation, to take a
stand on the question of splitting the ninth
circuit, United States Court of Appeals.
There was no division on the question of
inviting the ABA to Portland, nor to the
recommendation of the board that a volun-
tary contribution of $2 be made by mem-
bers of the bar to help finance the meet-
ing. The vote was unanimous. It was
pointed out that the ABA will contribute
$3000 toward the expenses and will provide
speakers and otherwise take over much of
the arrangement for the session.
But Robert F. Maguire urged the con-
vention to go slow on any proposal for an
indorsement of the project to split the
ninth circuit, declaring the movement did
not originate in the northwest and that it
was a California idea. He felt it better
to wait until congress has acted on two
measures which would provide two addi-
tional judges for the circuit.
He urged the convention not to be stam-
peded into any indorsement of the idea
until it had more facts in the matter. The
proposal, thereupon, was tabled. Since
there are now three northwest members on
the circuit court, this proposal to split the
circuit was regarded suspiciously by friends
of Federal Judge James Alger Fee who
want to see him on the circuit bench.
The convention was opened with an in-
vocation by Rev. Peter Barker, vicar of
Calvary Episcopal church at Seaside, after
President Robert A. Leedy had called the
convention to order. There were reports by
Secretary Lee Karr and by Treasurer Wil-
liam H. Morrison.
Karr added to his printed report the
statement that the past year had been the
biggest on record on the basis of the gen-
eral membership participation in bar ac-
tivities, such as the legislative counsel, the
educational program, committee work, code
revision, radio program and the public re-
lations program in the schools. Much work
also was done by the lawyers placement
service which helped young lawyers to get
started in their practice, he said.
The report of the committee on corpora-
tion law (page 5) was adopted after R. R.
Bullivant reported that the attorney gen-
(Continued on Page 6, Column 1)

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