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11 Or. St. B. Bull. 1 (1950-1951)

handle is hein.barjournals/osbb0011 and id is 1 raw text is: OREGON STATE BAR
BULLETIN
VOL. XI.    OCTOBER, 1950  No. 1

NEW COMMITTEES

CIVIL RIGHTS BILL

DELEGATE REPORTS

NAMED BY BOARD APPROVED BY GROUP ON ABA CONVENTION

Closer attention to committee work by
the members of the board of governors is
anticipated this year through action by E.
K. Oppenheimer, president, in naming A. C.
Goodrich, vice-president, Bend, as liaison
officer between the board and the commit-
tees of the bar and imposing upon him the
responsibility of seeing that the committees
function and make seasonable reports so
that at the next annual meeting the entire
bar may have the full benefit of the work
done,
The appointment of committees was one
of the important matters before the board
at their meeting in Portland on October 27
and 28. This work tied in with the adop-
tion of the budget for the year. The in-
creased program of service to the lawyers
of the state by the board resulted in the
budget committee being required to cut
expenses to the bone in order to balance
the budget for the year.
As was told to the Multnomab Bar asso-
ciation at the dinner meeting Friday night,
the bar can do little to further continuing
legal education, public relations, the annual
meeting and other work which the mem-
bers of the bar have indicated they are
interested in and which they expect the
organized bar to promote unless increased
income is provided or these activities are
made strictly self supporting, or a com-
bination of the two.
The 1951 budget, published in this issue
of the Bulletin, has been balanced at $38,-
343. It is speculative in some respects and
will be considerably out of balance if a
considerable number of those in practice
and those about to finish law school are
called for military service.
There was considerable discussion at the
meeting of the fact that a special commit-
tee appointed by the board on bar admis-
sions which was supposed to report to the
board had instead submitted its findings
direct to the supreme court. The board,
apparently had no notice of this until it
came to their attention through members
of the board of bar examiners.
President Oppenheimer was authorized
to contact this committee at once and ob-
tain copies of the recommendations made
to the supreme court and circulate this
report among members of the board. The
hope was expressed that the supreme court
would not modify any existing rule or pro-
mulgate any new on(. until the board at
least knew what its own committee had
done.
It was understood at the meeting that
the report made certain recommendations
with reference to pre-legal examinations
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1)

Portland's civil rights ordinance was ap-
proved by a voice vote of the members of
the Multnomah Bar association who at-
tended a dinner meeting at the Benson
hotel on October 27. The vote came during
a business session of the association which
followed a program featuring the board of
governors of the Oregon State Bar.
E. K. Oppenheimer, president of the
state bar, keynoted the meeting when he
declared lawyers may personally disagree
but basically and fundamentally they stand
for  the  preservation  of constitutional
rights and the liberties granted by the bill
of rights. Lawyers are on the alert to pre-
serve and maintain our judicial system and
its autonomy.
No other class stands in this enviable
position. It is of prime importance-ne-
cessity if you please-that the public
should understand our position in these re-
spects, if nothing else. Lawyers are the
champions of democracy and American
ideals and we should not hesitate to pro-
claim our virtue to the public in this re-
spect.
His remarks became a rallying point
later when the ordinance was under con-
sideration.
President Oppenheimer called the atten-
tion of the more than 200 present, Includ-
ing Chief Justice Hall S. Lusk and Justice
George Rossman of the supreme court,
that the public at large does not always
have such a high opinion of the law and of
lawyers. He quoted a recent Roper survey
as reported in Life magazine as an off-set
against any complacency on the part of
the lawyers.
The Roper survey asked the following
question:
Rank the order of importance to the
community   of: public school teachers,
clergymen, public officials, merchants and
lawyers,
Teachers were in first place with a per-
centage of 31.3, clergymen in second with
27.1, public officials third with 19.1, mer-
chants fourth with 12.8 and lawyers a poor
fifth with 9.7.
The president outlined some of the pro-
grams of the state bar and the necessity
of the lawyers keeping up with the times
and being willing to adopt progressive steps
if they meet the needs. Two matters which
he spoke of particularly as having great in-
fluence upon the attitude of the public
were the delayed calendars and dockets
and the length of time that cases are kept
under advisement after having been sub-
mitted to the court for decision.
The inability to get cases tried within
a reasonable time and likewise decided, is
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1)

The 1950 meeting of the American Bar
association in Washington, D. C., during
the week of September 18 was of outstand-
ing importance, F. M. Sercombe, state bar
delegate, report to the board of governors
of the Oregon bar upon his return. Other
official delegates from Oregon were Robert
F. Maguire, state delegate, and Sidney
Teiser, member of the board of governors.
In his report Sercombe called attention
to the fact that the 1951 ABA meeting
will be held in New York next year during
the week of September 17 and recommend-
ed that the state bar convention be sched-
uled for some other time. The 1950 Oregon
bar meeting was held the same week as
the ABA convention.
In his report Sercombe paid particular
attention to the following matters.
Various items of action taken by the
ABA board of governors during the year
were reported to the house and approved.
Among these was the appointment of a
commission of seven members to cooperate
with the special committee of the United
States senate to investigate organized
crime in interstate commerce headed by
Senator Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. The
commission is to make a study of the need
for modernization of the rules of procedure
and practice in the field of criminal law,
the steps which are being taken to codify
criminal codes of procedure, the efforts
which are being made to improve the codes
so that criminals may not escape prosecu-
tion, the adequacy of public defender acts,
the methods and practices of sentencing
and the tendency on the part of the pro-
fession to withdraw from the practice of
criminal law. One member of this commis-
sion will be a representative from the sec-
tion of bar activities and another member
will be a representative from the Confer-
ence of Bar Association Presidents.
The House approved a revision of the
ABA membership application blank to re-
quire a signed answer to the question 'Are
you now or have you been a member of the
communist party?'
Report was made that the association
has an opportunity to acquire a most de-
sirable building and grounds for a national
headquarters for the American Bar asso-
ciation at Des Moines, Iowa, to replace the
present inadequate and antiquated head-
quarters in Chicago. Appointment of a
special committee to investigate the de-
sirability of such purchase was authorized.
The house recommended that court per-
sonnel should be recruited and kept under
the merit system, that veterans' prefer-
ences in government employment should
be restricted, that appeals to the Courts
(Continued on Page 7, Column 1)

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