About | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline

1985 Newsl. 1 (1985)

handle is hein.aals/aalsnews1985 and id is 1 raw text is: 




      the



Prsdn s' Addres


ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS - ONE DUPONT CIRCLE e WASHINGTON, D.C. 20036  No. 85-1 JANUARY 1985


        WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT:

TEACHING AND SCHOLARSHIP

                           By
                   Roger C. Cramto'


  (Prepared for delivery to the House of Representatives of the Association of American Law Schools, January 4, 1985,
  Washington, D.C.)

      In recent years affairs of state have dominated the remarks of my predecessors. A succession of regulatory
  measures, usually emanating from the American Bar Association, have required attention: mandated instruction in
  professional skills and professional responsibility; the special problems of schools with a strong religious affiliation;
  and the faculty status of clinical teachers. Each controversy was resolved by a compromise which, although not fully
  satisfying to the contending interests, provides the basis for continuing improvement in both the quality and
  diversity of legal education.

      With these regulatory controversies no longer at white heat, we are enjoying a happy moment of calm. What can
  a president-elect speak about when there is no ready-made controversy creating internal and external strife? I
  propose some brief reflections on the importance and vitality of those activities that led us to choose the academic life
  - teaching and scholarship. Isn't that what it's all about - teaching and scholarship?

      In times of fiscal retrenchment, institutional self-examination, and personal doubt, it is easy for teachers to fall
  into cynicism and despair. And some trends in higher education warrant our concern. [T]he modern university,
  Nevitt Sanford has said, has succeeded in separating almost everything that belongs together. . . . [Flields of
  inquiry [have] been subdivided until they have become almost meaningless; research has been separated from
  teaching, teaching and research from action, and, worst of all, thought from humane feeling.

      Law schools have not escaped this fragmentation of the educational enterprise. Passive students drift off to
  work settings. Some lonely professors concentrate on specialized scholarship that may be intelligible only to a small
  coterie of other specialists; others divert their attention to outside consulting. Institutional reward mechanisms
  encourage narrow and solitary specialized work while deemphasizing teaching, breadth of scholarship, and collegial
  activity. Students and faculty are absorbed, competitively and acquisitively, in ever narrower specialties and the
  development of technical virtuosity. Breadth, coherence, cooperation, and communal goals tend to suffer. How do
  we rebuild our morale as teachers in times such as these?

      The saving grace is that both teachers and students are social animals who are naturally inquisitive, cooperative,
  and open to insight. They not only have an innate capacity to learn, but find teaching and learning enjoyable and
  pleasurable - unless, of course, the pleasure and enjoyment have been driven out because education has become a
  grim effort dominated by a boot-camp mentality or the rote learning of formulas.
EDITOR: NOEL J. AUGUSTYN, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR                          EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: MILLARD H. RUUD
                             Printing and Distribution Courtesy of Foundation Press, Inc.

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 3,000 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Contact us for annual subscription options:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?

profiles profiles most