83 Tul. L. Rev. 661 (2008-2009)
Artists' Moral Rights and the Psychology of Ownership

handle is hein.journals/tulr83 and id is 667 raw text is: Artists' Moral Rights and the
Psychology of Ownership
Barbara A. Spellman*
Frederick Schauert
I.   INTRODUCTION    ............................................................................. 661
II.  OVERVIEW AND RATIONALE OF THE RESEARCH .......................... 666
III. EXPERIMENT 1: THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT ART .................... 667
IV. EXPERIMENT 2: ART, ARTISTS, AND AGREEMENT ....................... 668
A.   Effect ofAgreement with the Expressed Opnon ............ 670
B.   Effect of Involvement in Art .............................................. 671
V    C ONCLU  SION S  .............................................................................. 674
APPENDIX: THE EXPERIMENTAL MATERIALS ...................................... 677
I.   INTRODUCTION
What do we own when we own something? Law students long
ago learned to understand property as a bundle of rights and not as a
thing,' and thus it is now well-known that ownership not only confers
privileges, but in   fact consists of privileges.      When    we   own
something-a car, a boat, a sack of potatoes-we have the right to use
it or use it up; show it or hide it; bend, fold, or mutilate it; or destroy it
forever. Or do we? Certainly not if the something is animate, like a
pet.2 Usually not if the something is a historic building with a
landmark designation.' In these and countless other instances, the
bundle may turn out to contain fewer sticks than people formerly
believed and fewer than many people believe now.
Most of us do know now that the bundle of rights surrounding
ownership of a pet or a historic building is more limited than the
bundle surrounding a sack of potatoes, but what if what is owned is a
 2009 Barbara A. Spellman and Frederick Schauer.
*    Professor of Psychology and Professor of Law, University of Virginia.
t    David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Virginia.
1.   See J.E. Penner, The Bundle of Rights Picture of Property, 43 UCLA L. REv.
711, 712 (1996); see also Kaiser Aetna v. United States, 444 U.S. 164, 176 (1979); Amnon
Lehavi, The PropertyPuzze, 96 GEO. L.J. 1987, 2001 (2008); Thomas W Merrill & Henry E.
Smith, What Happened to Property in Law andEconomicsZ, 111 YALE L.J. 357, 365 (2001 ).
2.   See Davis v. Commonwealth, 30 Pa. 421,424 (1858).
3.   See Penn Cent. Transp. Co. v. NewYork City, 438 U.S. 104, 142 (1978).
661

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