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82 N.D. L. Rev. 953 (2006)
Tribal Sovereignty in a Post-9/11 World

handle is hein.journals/nordak82 and id is 959 raw text is: TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY IN A POST-9/11 WORLD
ANGELA R. RILEY*
I.  IN TR O D U CTIO  N  ................................................................... 953
II. SANTA CLARA PUEBLO             .................................................... 955
A .  BACKGROUND       .................................................................. 955
B .  R EACTION  S  ........................................................................ 957
III. CHANGING CONTEMPORARY CIRCUMSTANCES ..... 959
A.   RENEWED    SCRUTINY    ........................................................ 959
1.  Indian  G am ing  ............................................................ 959
2. Sovereignty in a Post-9/11    World ................. 961
IV .  C O N CLU SIO  N   ........................................................................ 964
I. INTRODUCTION
It is not uncommon today for Americans to reference their lives in
binary fashion: for many, time is now divided quite simply into life pre- and
post-September 11, 2001. I have only been a law professor in a post-9/11
world. In one sense this is unfortunate, because I cannot offer insights into
the differences between teaching Federal Indian Law and Santa Clara
Pueblo v. Martinez,1 in particular, before and after 9/11. On the other hand,
because I did not teach this controversial case in the late 1970s when it was
decided-at the height of the feminist movement and on the heels of
America's civil rights revolution-my perspective on the case is decidedly
post-feminist, post-modem, and assuredly post-9/1 1.
*J.D., Harvard Law School; B.A. University of Oklahoma. Associate Professor of Law,
Southwestern University School of Law; Justice, Citizen Potawatomi Nation Supreme Court.
This article incorporates ideas explored more fully in two forthcoming articles concerning law,
liberalism, and tribal governance: Angela R. Riley, Sovereignty and Illiberalism, 95 CAL. L. REv.
(forthcoming June 2007) [hereinafter llliberalism]; Angela R. Riley, Good (Native) Governance
COLUM. L. REv. (forthcoming June 2007) [hereinafter Governance]. Many thanks to Professors
Matthew Fletcher and Wenona Singel for inviting me to present this paper at North Dakota School
of Law American Indian Law's Pedagogy Conference. Thanks also to the conference participants
and the North Dakota Law Review for their thoughtful input on this work. Kristen Carpenter
graciously read and provided comments on early drafts. SoYun Roe and Alexander Maleki
provided outstanding research assistance.
1. 436 U.S. 49 (1978).

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