83 Judicature 92 (1999-2000)
State Courts Look Ahead (continued)

handle is hein.journals/judica83 and id is 94 raw text is: (from page 86)
Misses, which summarizes both on-
and off-mark predictions from previ-
ous Trends. The section's authors,
Skove and Paula Hannaford, note-
with some relief-that the predicted
growth in private-sector Rent-A-
Judges for those who could afford
them has not really materialized, ex-
cept in California. And they admitted
that Trends's 1994-95 excitement for
electronic kiosk stations far exceeded
the technology's actual effects. But
prior reports' forecasts concerning
increased tobacco litigation and
the growing use of restorative jus-
tice for juvenile offenders were
right on target. V
The full text of Trends is available for
download at www.ncsc.dni.us/is/
product2.htm or by calling (800) 616-
6164.
KRISTINE STANIK is assistant editor of
Judicature.

92 Judicature Volume 83, Number 2  September-October 1999

GENES AND JUSTICE
A Symposium Issue of Judicature
The November-December 1999 issue of Judicature will explain and ex-
plore advancements in genetics research and DNA technology and its
implications for and impact on the courts and judges.
Among the contributors and articles are: Delaware Supreme CourtJus-
tice Joseph T. Walsh on The evolving role of the judiciary in admitting
scientific evidence; MaxwellJ. Mehlman, director of the Case Western
Reserve University Law-Medicine Center, on Gene therapy; Mark A.
Rothstein, director of the Health Law & Policy Institute at the University
of Houston Law Center, on How behavioral genetics will affect the law
and the courts; Chris Asplen, executive director of the National Com-
mission on the Future of DNA Evidence, on From crime scene to court-
room: the integration of DNA technology; and Richard Gold, a profes-
sor at the University of Western Ontario Faculty of Law, on Judicial
responses to biotechnology.
If you are not already a member of the AmericanJudicature Society, and
want to make sure you receive this symposium that stands at the nexus of
science, technology, and the courts, please contact Diane Salinas at AJS:
(312) 558-6900 x145 or members@ajs.org.

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE
DEAN
The National Judicial College is a non-profit educational institution providing continu-
ing education to state judges, federal and state administrative law judges, tribal judges
and other court officials. The College, affiliated with the American Bar Association and
located on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, seeks a Dean with experience in
judicial and continuing professional education, and with strong interpersonal, organiza-
tional and administrative skills. Judicial and computer technological experience is desir-
able.
The Dean reports to the President and serves as the supervisor of the Academic De-
partment and is responsible for its daily operations. The Dean acts for the President in his
or her absence and assists the President in external relations and in developing long-
range plans. The salary is competitive, plus excellent fringe benefits. Applicants will be
considered until the position is filled. Contact the President's office for a more complete job
description at 775-784-6747.
Please send resume in confidence by December 1 to:
President Percy R. Luney, Jr.
The National Judicial College
Judicial College Building, MS 358
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, Nevada 89557
Fax: 775-784-4234
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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