13 J. Pat. Off. Soc'y 547 (1931)
The Ten Greatest Inventions of Our Time

handle is hein.journals/jpatos13 and id is 567 raw text is: November, 1931, Vol. XIII, No. 11

The Ten Greatest Inventions of Our Time
From the Scientific American, November 1, 1913
By WM. I. WYMAN.
Editorial Note: The accompanying essay, reprint-
ed by permission, and in connection with the article
which follows, received the first prize in the contest
for an essay on the subject What Are the Ten
Greatest Inventions of Our Time, and Why?
The contest was open to the whole world and con-
testants from Belgium, England and Malta received
honorable mention. The inventions to be listed
were limited to those of commercial importance and
introduced or patented in the 25 years preceding
the contest date.
Five-and-twenty years ago is a hundred years off-so much has
our social life changed in those five lusters.-Thackeray In The
Newcomes.
N O single invention of the last twenty-five years initiated an
industrial epoch in the sense that the locomotive or Bes-
semer converter did, yet no former period has been so rich in
developments of striking importance or so productive of im-
provements whose aggregate so vitally affected our economic and
social life. In this short space of time the dreams of ages have
come true-man has been able to fly, opaque bodies rendered
transparent, and intelligence transmitted between distant points
without material communicating means.
This short quarter century has seen the world-wide acceptance
of electrical transportation, the introduction of high-power gen-
eration and transmission of electricity, the radical changes in
construction due to the use of steel and re-enforced concrete,
and innumerable valuable improvements in chemical and allied
arts. Perfected during this period were such epoch-making in-
ventions as smokeless powder, high-speed steel, contact method
of making sulphuric acid, electrolytic refining of copper, the
quick-acting brake, automatic telephone exchange, centrifugal
cream-separator, tungsten lamp, Diesel oil-motor, and Harvey-
ized armor-plate, which changed existing practices so radically
or induced economics of such vast degree as to make it difficult
to exclude them from any list except by the adoption of a stand-
ard so high as to be unthought of at any other time.
In making a selection from the bewilderingly opulent array of
creative activities of the period, only such inventions were in-

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 2,700 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Access to this content requires a subscription. Please visit the following page to request a quote or trial:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?