2 J. Hist. Int'l L. 1 (2000)
When Was the Law of International Society Born - An Inquiry of the History of International Law from an Intercivilizational Perspective

handle is hein.journals/jhintl2 and id is 7 raw text is: When was the Law of International Society Born? -
An Inquiry of the History of International Law from an
Intercivilizational Perspective*
ONUMA Yasuaki
Contents
I The History of International Law and the Notion of International Law
I The Link between the History and Notion of International Law
2 The Notion of International Law Held by Major Publicists
3 The Problem of Eurocentrism: Perspective vs. Historical Record, or Both?
lI The Coexistence of Regional Civilizations in the Pre-Twsentieth Century World
1 The Peculiarity of Today's World
2 The Sinocentric Tribute System in East Asia
3 The Muslim World and the Siyar
4 The Decentralized Structures and Christianity in the European World
III The Globalization of Eurocentric Ordering of the World in the Nineteenth Century
I The Collision of Two Civilizations
2 Conflicts of Two Universalistic Systems in East Asia
3 The Collapse of the Islamocentric System of World Ordering
4 The Partition of Africa and the Law of Civilized Nations
5 The Collapse of the Sinocentric System of World Ordering
IV In Search of Overcoming the Westcentrisin in International Law
I Earlier Criticism of Modern Eurocentrism
2 Problems of Prevailing Concepts and Terminology
3 A View from an Intercivilizational Perspective
This is a preliminary paper giving the basic scheme of a book intended to reconstrue (and
reconstruct) the history of international law from an intercivilizational perspective. Due to this
preliminary nature, references will generally be given not in a specific way, but rather in a
summarized way. I am grateful to many people who kindly read earlier versions of my manuscript
including the Japanese version: Professor Nicholas Onuf, Professor Jrg Fisch, Professor Benedict
Kingsbury, Professor Yogesh Tyagi, Professor Watanabe Hiroshi, Professor Magami Toshiki,
Professor Moteki Toshio, Professor Suzuki Tadasu, Professor Nitta Ichiro, Professor Morozumi
Yoshiaki, Professor Matsubara Kentaro, Ms Besty Roeben, Mr Gregory Ellis, Mr Saito Tamitomo,
Ms Huh Sookyeon and Mr Richard Small. Given the enormity of the task, I am fully aware of
the limits of my knowledge and ability to theorize. I will welcome comments from the reader
and take them into account for my future book.
In this article, I seek to express the order of the name given according to the proper way
respective of culture. For example, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese names generally
appear with family name preceding given name.

Journal of the History of International Law 2: 1-66, 2000.
©2000 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands.

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