28 Immigr. & Nat'lity L. Rev. 741 (2007)
Perfect Victims and Real Survivors: The Iconic Victim in Domestic Human Trafficking Law

handle is hein.journals/inlr28 and id is 753 raw text is: PERFECT VICTIMS AND REAL SURVIVORS: THE ICONIC
VICTIM IN DOMESTIC HUMAN TRAFFICKING LAW
JAYASHRI SRIKANTIAH*
INTRODUCTION     ............................................................................................... 158
I. TRAFFICKING AND LEGISLATION ........................................................ 162
A.   The Human Trafficking Phenomenon .......................................... 162
1.  D om estic  W orkers ................................................................. 164
2. Migrant Workers in Restaurants, Hotels, Farm Work, or
Factories  ................................................................................  165
3.  Forced  Sex  W ork  ................................................................... 166
B. Anti-Trafficking Legislation ........................................................ 166
1.  In ternational Efforts ............................................................... 166
2. Background to U.S. Legislation ............................................ 168
3.  T he  Statute .............................................................................  173
II. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE STATUTE'S IMMIGRATION PROVISIONS ..... 176
A. Language of Regulations ............................................................. 176
B.   Agency  Implementation    ............................................................... 177
C.   Practical Challenges with the Regulations and
Imp lem entation  ............................................................................  178
1. The Regulatory Burdens, in Practice ..................................... 179
2. Focus on Trafficking for Sex Work ....................................... 184
III. EXPLAINING THE RESTRICTIVE REGULATORY APPROACH .................. 187
A .  The  Iconic  Victim   .........................................................................  187
B.   Trafficking Versus Illegal Entry and Smuggling ......................... 187
1.  Illegal A liens... ...............................................................  188
2. Iconic Victims and Illegal Border Crossings ......................... 191
C.   The Iconic Victim as Prosecution Witness ................................... 195
1. Iconic Victims in Contrast to Traffickers .............................. 195
2. Cooperation with Prosecution .............................................. 199
D.   The Iconic Victim and Stereotypes of Foreign Women ................ 201
E.   Cultural Effect on Understandings of Human Trafficking .......... 204
F.   A Modest Proposalfor Change ................................................... 207
I.  Centralized  Decision  M aking ................................................ 207
2.  The  Applicable  Standard  ....................................................... 209
Associate Professor of Law and Director, Immigrants' Rights Clinic, Stanford Law
School. I am grateful to Juliet Brodie, Janie Chuang, Tino Cuellar, George Fisher, Jeff
Fisher, Dan Ho, Kevin Johnson, Anil Kalhan, Mark Kelman, Amalia Kessler, Kathleen
Kim, David Levine, Larry Marshall, Alison Morantz, Alan Morrison, David Olson, Deborah
Rhode, Leti Volpp, Rob Weiner, and Bob Weisberg for very helpful comments on previous
drafts of this Article. I also thank Barbara Fried for early conversations about the Article,
and Nila Bala, Michael Kaufman, and Jenifer Rajkumar for excellent research assistance.
741
Originally published in 87 Boston University Law Review 157 (2007). Used by
permission.

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