93 Colum. L. Rev. 1833 (1993)
Issue 8

handle is hein.journals/clr93 and id is 1847 raw text is: COLUMBIA LAW REVIEW
VOL. 93                   DECEMBER 1993                         NO. 8
THE LOST CENTURY OF AMERICAN IMMIGRATION
LAW (1776-1875)
Gerald L. Neuman*
INTRODUCTION   ................................................. 1833
I. THE NEED FOR INVESTIGATION ............................. 1835
II. MAJOR CATEGORIES OF STATE IMMIGRATION LEGISLATION .... 1841
A .  Crim e  ................................................ 1841
B. Poverty and Disability ................................. 1846
1.  M assachusetts  ..................................... 1848
2.  New  York  ......................................... 1852
3. Other States and Federal Responses ............... 1857
C.  Contagious Disease  ................................... 1859
D.  Race  and  Slavery  ..................................... 1865
1. Prohibiting Immigration'of Free Blacks to the State. 1866
2. The Seamen's Acts ................................ 1873
3. The Migration of Slaves ........................... 1878
E. Ideological Restriction and Alien Registration .......... 1880
F.  Sum m ary  ............................................. 1883
III.  Two  OBJECTIONS  ......................................... 1884
A. The Ineffectiveness of State Regulation ................ 1884
B. The Constitutionality of State Immigration Legislation . 1885
1. Exclusive Federal Power ........................... 1886
2. Immigration Under Treaties ....................... 1894
IV. WHAT FOLLOWS? ........................................... 1896
CONCLUSION   ................................................... 1901
INTRODUCTION
Legal discussions of immigration regulation in the United States
rest upon a myth. This pervasive myth asserts that the borders of the
* Professor of Law, Columbia University School of Law. This Article is dedicated
to C., who has waited a long time for it. I owe deep gratitude to Bradley J. Nicholson,
who spent the summer of 1988 collecting statutes with me, and diverse thanks to many
others, including Barbara Black, Seth Kreimer, Bruce Mann, Henry Monaghan, Eben
Moglen, John Mulkern, John Scanlan, Maryellen Fullerton and the other participants in
a faculty workshop at Brooklyn Law School, and the staffs of Biddle Law Library and
Columbia Law Library. For generous support of the research, I thank the Ida Russell
Cades Memorial Fund, the Dean's Fund, the Institute for Law and Economics of the
University of Pennsylvania Law School, theJohn M. Olin Foundation, the Samuel Rubin
Program for the Advancement of Law and Equality Through Law and the Walter E.
Meyer Research in Law and Social Problems Fund of the Columbia University School of
Law.

1833

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