84 Cal L. Rev. 493 (1996)
Why Are There So Few Black Lawyers in Corporate Law Firms--An Institutional Analysis

handle is hein.journals/calr84 and id is 507 raw text is: California Law Review
VOL. 84                                 MAY 1996                                No. 3
Copyright 0 1996 by California Law Review, Inc.
Why Are There So Few Black Lawyers
in Corporate Law Firms?
An Institutional Analysis
David B. Wilkinst
G. Mitu Gulatitt
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction ..................................................................................... 496
I.   Defining the Problem ................................................................. 501
A. Are Blacks Underrepresented in Corporate Firms? ............... 502
B. Why Study Institutions and Incentives? ................................ 506
1.   Differential Abilities ...................................................... 506
2.   Lack of Interest ............................................................. 508
Copyright © 1996 California Law Review, Inc.
t   Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law and Director, Program on the Legal Profession, Harvard
Law School.
tt   Law clerk to Judge Sandra L. Lynch, United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit.
The authors wish to thank Ian Ayres, Lee Buchheit, Janet Bauman, Elizabeth Chambliss, Steve
Choi, Sarah Cooleybeck, Howard Erlanger, Laurenn Edelman, Richard Epstein, Marc Galanter,
Bryant Garth, Gibson Gayle, Robert Gordon, Lani Guinier, Andrew Guzman, Terence Halliday,
Gloria Howard, Mark Ramseyer, Richard Revesz, Steven Shavell, Patrick Shin, Reva Siegel, Cass
Sunstein, David Thomas, and Tim Wilkins for their generous comments on earlier drafts. We are
particularly grateful to Professor David Charny, not only for his insights upon which many of our
theories are based, but also for his continuing encouragement of this ongoing project. We also thank
Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton for giving Mr. Gulati both encouragement and time to work on this
project while he was an associate there. In addition, Professor Wilkins thanks the University of
California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law, Morrison & Foerster, and the Robert D. and Leslie
Kay Raven Trust for their generous support of the lecture series at Boalt Hall where these ideas were
first presented. Richard Kilbride, Yan Senouf, and Maura Kelley provided invaluable assistance.
This article is dedicated to the loving memory of Professor John R. Wilkins, who was a member of the
Boalt Hall faculty from 1964 until his death in 1976, and to Albert Maule, whose keen insights about
the problems faced by blacks in corporate firms advanced our thinking immeasurably.

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