53 Am. U. L. Rev. 261 (2003-2004)
Freedom of Information Act Post-9/11: Balancing the Public's Right to Know, Critical Infrastructure Protection, and Homeland Security

handle is hein.journals/aulr53 and id is 279 raw text is: COMMENT
THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT
POST-9/11: BALANCING THE PUBLIC'S
RIGHT TO KNOW, CRITICAL
INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, AND
HOMELAND SECURITY
KRISTEN ELIZABETH UHL*
TABLE OF CONTENTS
In troduction  ......................................................................................... 263
I. The Freedom of Information Act's History and Mechanics ... 266
II. The Department ofJustice and FOIA Implementation .......... 269
A .  Background  ........................................................................ 269
B. The Expansion of Disclosure Under the Clinton
A dm inistration  .................................................................... 271
C. The Erosion of FOIA Under the Bush Administration .... 272
III. The Homeland Security Act of 2002 ................................... 274
A. The Origins of a Department of Homeland Security ....... 274
B. A    New    FOIA   Exemption    Under    the   Critical
Infrastructure Information Act of 2002 ............................. 277
1.  Critical infrastructure protection ................................. 281
2.  The likelihood  of cyber attacks .................................... 282
* Managing Editor, American University Law Review, Volume 53; J.D. Candidate,
May 2004, American University, Washington College of Law, B.S.F.S., 2000, Georgetown
University. I would like to thank my parents, Sam and Donna Uhl, for their loving
support and patience. I am grateful to Professor Robert G. Vaughn for sharing his
expertise on the Freedom of Information Act. I would also like to thank Stephanie
Quaranta, Rebecca Troth, Roy E. Brownell II, and the members of the American
University Law Review for their invaluable editorial assistance. Last but not least, I
could not have written this Comment without Loren Southard's insight and
unending encouragement. Thank you all for making my dream of publication a
reality.

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