42 B.C. Envtl. Aff. L. Rev. 541 (2015)
Free Riders on the Firestorm: How Shifting the Costs of Wildfire Management to Residents of the Wildland-Urban Interface Will Benefit Our Public Forests

handle is hein.journals/bcenv42 and id is 556 raw text is: 




  FREE RIDERS ON THE FIRESTORM: HOW
      SHIFTING THE COSTS OF WILDFIRE
    MANAGEMENT TO RESIDENTS OF THE
    WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE WILL
         BENEFIT OUR PUBLIC FORESTS


                           BENJAMIN REILLY*

  Abstract: Since the early 1900s, the federal land management agencies-the
  Forest Service in particular-have focused their wildfire management efforts on
  suppression. A century of wildfire suppression policy has created a buildup of
  natural fuels in the Nation's forests that contribute to larger, more damaging fires
  today. This, coupled with the rapid development of the Wildland-Urban Interface,
  makes today's wildfires a greater threat to human life and property. As a result,
  the federal government's annual expenditures for wildfire management have bal-
  looned in recent years. Relying on the billions of tax dollars spent each year to
  fight wildfire, individuals have continued to develop property on fire-prone lands
  and insurers continue to issue them policies with premiums that do not reflect the
  true risk of wildfire. This situation creates an implicit subsidy for residents of
  fire-prone lands, which presents many of the same pitfalls as the National Flood
  Insurance Program's explicit subsidy for residents of flood-prone lands. This
  Note advocates for a reform of the way we pay for wildfire management. Specif-
  ically, it encourages the federal government to implement a National Wildfire In-
  surance Program that employs a homeowner mandate to shift the costs of wild-
  fire management to those who directly benefit from it: the residents of the
  Wildland-Urban Interface.

                             INTRODUCTION

     In the summer of 2013, the Nation's attention was captured by the devas-
tation of the Yarnell Hill fire that burned in central Arizona. 1 A lightning strike
started the fire, and it was fueled by an extended drought and strong winds.2 It

    * Executive Notes Editor, BOSTON COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS LAW REVIEW, 2014
2015.
    1 See Kirk Siegler, A Tragic Year for WildlandFirefighters Ends in Tragedy, NAT'L PUB. RADIO
(Dec. 28, 2013, 9:49 AM), http://www.npr.org/2013/12/28/257771391/a-tragic-year-for-wildland-
firefighters-ends-in-reflection, archived at http://perna.cc/HSL7-SYUH (noting that the Yarnell fire
captured the Nation's attention to a degree that other fires have not).
   2 Jason Samenow, Behind the Weather That Led to the Deadly Yarnell Hill Fire, WASH. POST,
July 1, 2013, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2013/07/01/the-weather-
that-led-to-the-deadly-yarnell-hill-fire/, archived at http://perna.cc/5HSG-K3ML.

What Is HeinOnline?

With comprehensive coverage of government documents and more than 2,400 journals from inception on hundreds of subjects such as political science, criminal justice, and human rights, HeinOnline is an affordable option for colleges and universities. Documents have the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?