35 Jurimetrics J. 277 (1994-1995)
Probability and Proof in State v. Skipper: An Internet Exchange

handle is hein.journals/juraba35 and id is 299 raw text is: PROBABILITY AND PROOF
IN STATE v. SKIPPER:
AN INTERNET EXCHANGE
Ronald J. Allen, David J. Balding, Peter Donnelly,
Richard Friedman, David H. Kaye, Lewis Henry LaRue
Roger C. Park, Bernard Robertson, Alexander Stein*
This is not a conventional article. It is an edited version of messages
sent to an Internet discussion list.1 The listings begin with the mention of a
recent opinion of the Connecticut Supreme Court, parts of which are
reproduced below. The listings soon move to broader issues concerning
probability and other formal systems, their limitations, and their uses either
in court or as devices for understanding legal proof.2
* Ronald G. Allen is Professor of Law, Northwestern University. David J. Balding is
Lecturer in Probability and Statistics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary and
Westfield College, University of London. Peter Donnelly is Professor, Department of Statistics
and Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago. Richard Friedman is
Professor of Law, University of Michigan. David H. Kaye is Regents' Professor, College of
Law, Arizona State University. Lewis Henry LaRue is Professor of Law, Washington and Lee
University. Roger C. Park is Fredrikson & Byron Professor of Law, University of Minnesota.
Bernard Robertson is Professor, Department of Business Law, Massey University, New
Zealand. Alexander Stein is on the Law Faculty, Hebrew University, Israel. He is presently a
visiting professor at the University of Miami.
1. This list, bayesian-evidence@massey.ac.nz, is maintained by Bernard Robertson of the
Massey University, New Zealand. Additions and deletions have been made to the original
messages to enhance the clarity of the remarks. For the sake of brevity and focus, many
messages distributed on the list have not been included. The material in the footnotes was
prepared by the editor, David H. Kaye, with contributions from Richard Friedman.
2. Many of these broader issues have been discussed in other publications. See generally,
e.g., PROBABILITY AND INFERENCE IN THE LAW OF EVIDENCE: THE LIMITS AND USES OF
BAYESIANISM (Peter Tillers & Eric D. Green eds., 1988); Symposium, Decision and Inference
in Litigation, 13 CARDOZO L. REV. 253-1079 (1991). To avoid excessive repetition, some of

SPRING 1995

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