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50 J. Crim. L. & Criminology 460 (1959-1960)
Relationships of Scores and Education to Adjustment

handle is hein.journals/jclc50 and id is 472 raw text is: 






RELATIONSHIPS OF SCORES AND EDUCATION TO ADJUSTMENT

                                RODNEY M. COE*

  The author was formerly a research associate at the Woodward State Hospital and School at Wood-
ward, Iowa. After a two year tour of duty with the U. S. Army, he accepted an appointment with the
Rehabilitation Institute at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois where he is now located.
-EDITOR.


  In discussing his concept of prisonization,
Clemmer1 outlined the factors which he felt were
important in determining the degree of assimi-
lation into prison life. From this concept, it has
been inferred that inmate intelligence as determined
by psychometric evaluation and level of edu-
cational attainment play an important role in
inmate adjustment to institutional routine. Else-
where, it has been shown that other factors, e.g.,
family interest, number of associates, length of
present sentence, etc., are at least of equal, if not
more importance than intelligence and level of
education The discussion in this paper, however,
will be limited to psychometric scores and levels of
education and their relationship to prison ad-
justment.
  The inference from Clemmer's hypothesis can
be tested by data available from a larger study
now in progress. The samples consist of two groups
of one hundred inmates each. One group is con-
sidered best adjusted to institutional routine and
the other the most poorly adjusted as determined
by a panel of prison officials acting as judges.3 It is
  * The writer is indebted to Dr. Albert J. Shafter,
Assistant Director, Rehabilitation Institute, Southern
Illinois University, Carbondale, for general suggestions
and helpful criticisms and to Dr. Eugene D. Fitz-
patrick, Chairman, Guidance Department, Southern
Illinois University, Carbondale, for assistance with
statistical work.
  IDONALD CLEM    R. THE PRISON COMUNITY. 2nd
ed., New York: Rinehart and Co., 1958, p. 300.
  2 Cf., ERNEST W. BURGESS. FACTORS DETERMINING
SUCCESS OR FAILURE ON PAROLE, in A. A. BRUCE, A.
J. HARNO, E. W. BURGESS, AND J. LANDEsco, THE
WORKINGS OF THE INDETERMINITE SENTENCE LAW
AND PAROLE SYSTEM IN ILLINOIS. Springfield, Illinois:
Illinois State Board of Parole, 1928; SHELDON AND
ELEANOR T. GLUEcK. FIVE      HUNDRED CRIMINAL
CAREERS. New York: A. A. Knopf and Sons, 1930;
LLOYD E. OHLIN. SELECTION FOR PAROLE. New York:
Russell Sage Foundation, 1951.
  3 Good adjustment is defined as a lack of disciplinary
violations, long time on a preferred job, infrequent
changes in cell assignments, etc. Poor adjustment is
defined as receiving many disciplinary reports resulting
in punishment, frequent changes in cell and work
assignments, etc.


assumed that adjustment to institutional routine
runs on a continuum from poor to good4 and that
the two groups selected represent the extreme ends
of the continuum.
  Specifically, this paper is concerned with the
relationships of (1) psychometric scores to level
of education within each group, (2) psychometric
scores to adjustment and level of education to
adjustment between the two groups, and (3) the
combined factors of psychometric scores and level
of education to adjustment to institutional routine
between the two groups.
  The respective null hypotheses are (1) there is
no relationship between psychometric scores and
level of education within each group, (2) there is
no significant difference between the well adjusted
group and the most poorly adjusted group in
either psychometric scores or amount of education,
and (3) there is no relationship between the
combined factors and adjustment to institutional
routine.
  Basic data for the statistical analysis are pre-
sented in Tables I and II. To test the first hy-
pothesis, a   product-moment    co rrelation was
computed for the well adjusted group and for the
poorly adjusted group. The resulting correlation
coefficients were +.60 and   +.45, respectively.
Both coefficients were significant at the one per
cent level.5 Thus the first hypothesis that there is
no significant relationship between psychometric
scores and level of education is rejected for both
groups. Secondly, to determine the relationship
of psychometric scores to adjustment, and level
of education to adjustment between the two
groups, the chi square method -was used. The
resulting chi squares were 9.86 and 6.98, respec-
  I Cf. SANFORD BATES, quoted in CLEM5 ER, op. cit.,
p. 195.
  FANcis G. CoRNE IL. THE ESSENTIALS OF EDU-
CATIONAL STATIsTICs. New York: J. Wiley and Sons,
1956, Table 9.1, p. 179.

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