6 Envtl. L. 791 (1975-1976)
Floating Nuclear Power Plants: A Fleet on the Horizon; Selfridge, Gordon P.

handle is hein.journals/envlnw6 and id is 803 raw text is: FLOATING NUCLEAR POWER
PLANTS:
A FLEET ON THE HORIZON?
By
GORDON P. SELFRIDGE*
INTRODUCTION
It is possible to view the history of mankind in terms of his
ability to successfully adapt his needs to constantly changing
global conditions through technological advancements and innova-
tions. Undoubtedly, man's ability to harness the power of the atom
and the consequent dawning of the Atomic Age in the Twentieth
Century marks one of the most significant technological achieve-
ments in our history. The potential benefits from the wise and
efficient use of atomic energy are innumerable, despite the inher-
ent dangers that accompany this vast power. In light of the energy
crisis currently looming over the United States, nuclear power
plants may become an increasingly important source of electricity
in order to meet the constantly rising consumption of electrical
power. In fact, some estimates indicate that by the turn of the
century, the electrical energy generated by nuclear power plants
will increase from the present four percent to over half of the total
electrical energy produced in this country.'
Consistent with its innovative history, today's nuclear power
industry is poised at the ocean's edge in an attempt to meet the
everchanging and extremely varied demands of our nation. Pur-
sued by environmentalists, and hounded by a demand for electric-
ity that doubles every ten years,2 the nuclear power industry is
* Staff Counsel, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. B.A.,
Wake Forest University, 1971; J.D., University of Miami, 1974; L.L.M. candidate,
George Washington University. Member: Florida State Bar; District of Columbia
Bar.
The opinions expressed herein are solely those of the author, and they do not
necessarily represent the views of the Office of General Counsel of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or any other agency.
i. U.S. DEP'T OF COMMERCE, NOAA, REPORT TO THE CONGRESS ON OCEAN POLLU-
TION, OVER-FISHING, AND OFFSHORE DEVELOPMENT, JULY 1973 - JUNE 1974, at 59 (Jan.
1975) [hereinafter cited as COMMERCE REPORTI.
2. Energy demands are increasing so much that the world's total energy con-
sumption is expected to quadruple by the turn of the century. See generally Ramey,
Energy Needs of the Nation and Cost in Terms of Pollution, 14 ATOMIC ENERGY L.J.

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